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 | 758 Days Ago
Writing And Illustrating The Graphic Novel - Daniel Cooney: You Don't Need to Be a Great Artist to Create Your Own Comic Book or Graphic Novel. This Comprehensive Manual Shows You Everything You Need to Know to Turn The Beginning of a Story Idea into a Fully Illustrated and Visually Compelling Comic Book-And Get It Published to the Web or in Print. Shares the Secrets of Creating Characters and Plotlines, and Shows How to Bring Drama and Suspense to Your Story. Provides a Complete Understanding of Grids and Layouts, Panels, Captions, Speech, Lettering, Panel Transitions, and Angles of View. Instructs in the Essential Mechanics of Drawing, From Figures, Backgrounds, and Perspectives to Inking, Coloring, and Digital Rendering.
 | 736 Days Ago
The Elements of the Short Story by Edward Everett Hale and Fredrick Thomas Dawson, (1915). The legend of Sleepy Hollow, by W. Irving.--Rip Van Winkle, by W. Irving.--Irving as a story writer.--The great stone face, by N. Hawthorne.--Ethan Brand, by N. Hawthorne.--Hawthorne as a story writer.--The fall of the house of Usher, by E. A. Poe.--The murders in the Rue Morgue, by E. A. Poe.--Poe as a story writer.--The diamond lens, by F.-J. O'Brien.--The man without a country, by E. E. Hale.--The outcasts of Poker Flat, by F. B. Harte.--Some recent stories. I. The Legend of Sleepy Hollow. . .Washington Irving - II. Rip Van Winkle Washington Irving - III. Irving as a Story Writer - IV. The Great Stone Face. . .Nathaniel Hawthorne V. Ethan Brand . . .Nathaniel Hawthorne - VI. Hawthorne as a Story Writer - VII. The Fall oe the House of Usher .Edgar Allan Poe - VIII. The Murders in the Rue Morgue. Edgar Allan Poe - IX. Poe as a Story Writer - X. The Diamond Lens - Fitz-James O'Brien - XI. The Man Without A Country . . . Edward Everett Hale - XII. The Outcasts of Poker Flat. . .Francis Bret Harte. - XIII. Some Recent Stories rn
 | 738 Days Ago
How to write a book in 30 days: Worksheets. Worksheet l: Character sketch - Worksheet 2A: General setting sketch - Worksheet 2B: Character setting sketch - Worksheet 3: Research list - Worksheet 4: Plot sketch - Worksheet 5: Summary outline - Worksheet 6: Miscellaneous scene notes - Worksheet 7: Closing scene notes - Worksheet 8: Interview questions - Worksheet 9: Dialogue sheet - Worksheet l0: Fact sheet - Worksheet ll: Background timeline - Worksheet 12: Miscellaneous timeline - Worksheet 13: Story evolution - Worksheet 14: Formatted outline capsule - Worksheet 15: Day sheet. The worksheets for download are from "Writer's Digest Write Your Novel in 30 Days." Get a complete copy of the magazine @ http://amzn.to/2dURHnB or http://socialpolitan.org/fiction-writing-craft/blogs/entry/Write-Your-Novel-in-30-Days-NaNoWriMo
 | 727 Days Ago
Hints on Writing Short Stories by Charles Joseph Finger (1922). In the first place, there must be Sincerity. Without that nothing can be done. Sincere work will be good work, and sincere work will be original work. With sincerity, you will have honesty and simplicity, both of which are cardinal virtues in the literary man. Also, with sincerity there will be courage. You know, as well as I know, that when you meet an in- sincere man, you detect him at once. Were you ever deceived, for instance, by the rounded periods of some political rhetorician? Perhaps for a moment you may have been carried away in spite of your better sense, but, certainly, the effect was not lasting. Examining yourself, you will certainly remember that before you could persuade others, you had to be thoroughly convinced of the essential right of the thing itself. In the same fashion then, you must be persuaded of the truth of that which you wish to be accepted when writing. I do not speak of controversial matters. I write of fiction. You must have so thoroughly identified yourself with your characters that they are as living creatures to you. Then only shall they be living characters to your readers. If you have read the Pickwick Papers and have learned to know and love Samuel Pickwick, you will know exactly what I mean. In that character, the young Charles Dickens lost himself. In creating Mr. Pickwick he was entirely sincere. He watched the character grow from a somewhat simple-minded old gentleman to a lovable, jolly fellow to meet whom you would walk half round the world. Pick- wick was real to Dickens; therefore he is real to us. Observe this too; he had his faults. Mr. Pickwick would not have been considered rna good or a moral character to many of the “unco guid” of today. He often drank too much. Had there been nation wide prohibition in England in his day, he would certainly have drunk home brew with Ben Allen and Bob Sawyer exactly as he went to prison for conscience sake. He and his companions enjoyed the pleasures of the table too well for latter day tastes. He was obstinate on occasion, just as I am obstinate. Had Dickens been insincere, he might have been tempted to sponge out the bad spots in his character. But then he would have given us something that was not a man. The truth is that we want something of the sensuous and the gross in those about us. None of us want to live with angels and saints. So we reject instinctively as impossible and unpleasant, those perfect, etherealized creations some times found in stories — those returns all compounded of nobility, courage, beauty, generosity and wisdom which insincere writers try to foist upon us. They do not ring true. We detect their hollowness just as we detect the hollowness of the flamboyant boastings of the political orator.
 | 768 Days Ago
Write Good or Die: Survival tips for 21st century writers, from best-selling authors Kevin J. Anderson, M.J. Rose, Heather Graham, J.A. Konrath, Gayle Lynds, Alexandra Sokoloff, Jonathan Maberry, and more. How to develop your craft, improve your writing, get an agent, promote your work, embrace the digital age, and prepare yourself for the coming changes in the publishing industry. Edited by Scott Nicholson.
 | 769 Days Ago
Writing Tools: 50 Essential Strategies for Every Writer: The introductory column to the workbench of Roy Peter Clark.
 | 713 Days Ago
Lajos Egri's Character Bone Structure Physiology. Lajos Egri's Character Bone Structure Physiology 1. Sex 2. Age 3. Height and weight 4. Color of hair, eyes, skin 5. Posture 6. Appearance: good-looking, over- or ...
 | 770 Days Ago
Novel in 30 Days Worksheets: To help you successfully complete your book in 30 days, here are nine worksheets to help you keep track of plot, scenes, characters and revisions. All of these worksheets originally appeared in Book in a Month by Victoria Lynn Schmidt and were also featured in the special issue Write Your Novel in 30 Days.
 | 770 Days Ago
Character Chart for Fiction Writers: Looking for an easy way to keep track of your character's biographical information? Trying to come up with some unique personality details? Print and use this chart to enrich your characters' identities.
 | 740 Days Ago
The Universal Plot Catalog: an examination of the elements of plot material and construction, combined with a complete index and a progressive category in which the source, life and end of all dramatic conflict and plot matter are classified. By Henry Albert Phillips, (1916). A very great editor once told me something that has always stuck in my mind. It was just after I had come to New York from a small western town and, although I recognized the truth of what he said, I did not appreciate its depth. "A writer sells his first story on account of plot — after that technique has to pull him through. I knew that he had said something, but it took me a long time fighting away at writing to realize the truth of his remark. Every person who has the cosmic urge in him that makes him put himself on paper in narrative form has a big story in him before he touches his pen. The author seizes his pen and what is in him flows out. He sends it out and it sells.


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