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 | 1000 Days Ago
The Art of the Short Story by Carl Henry Grabo, (1913). The principles of narrative structure, which I have set down here, are for the most part true of the novel as well as of the short story, though for conciseness and clearness I have discussed their application chiefly to the latter. They are, most of them, commonly enough held, though in my college work I have felt the need of a book which should collect and relate them in simple, orderly, and yet comprehensive fashion. The material is scattered, and the amateur writer cannot easily find it.
 | 1000 Days Ago
A Manual of the Short Story Art by Glenn Clark (1922). This book was written with an eye on the student, not on the rules of composition and rhetoric. It conceives of the student as a creature who loves to use his eyes and ears, and who takes delight in playing the amateur detective and in raveling and unravelling plots. It assumes that a young man or a young woman is filled to overflowing with warm, living interests and desires and aspirations which, taken together, constitute a greater driving force toward success in writing than anything which the textbooks and teachers can give him. By taking advantage of these natural desires and instincts and not working against them it is believed that the teacher may best "draw out" the student to the fullest self-expression. One of these deep-seated instincts of the student is to see things in the concrete. For that reason the method of presenting exercises commonly used in this book is the so-called "projective method." Instead of being asked to describe a city street, the student is asked to read a sentence that helps him to visualize a street and then to write down what he sees.
 | 1001 Days Ago
Art In Short Story Narration: A Searching Analysis of the Qualifications of Fiction in General, and of the Short Story in Particular, with Copious Examples, Making the Work A PRACTICAL TREATISE. By Henry Albert Phillips, (1913). Many books have been written bearing chiefly upon the technical side of fiction construction, but few — indeed, if any — have taken a step further and undertaken to analyze and reconstruct the artistic qualifications essential to fiction literature. Sometimes it is easier to tell how to do a thing, than it is to do it or to define intelligently the nature of the thing to be done. The literary craft has been informed so often how it should do its work, that it seems refreshing to be told in definite terms just what that work is." Art in Short Story Narration," then, is a book of unusual timeliness. Never before, have so many short stories been written — and published; never before has there been such a vast army of tyros — and such a great company of successful authors. In like proportion, the field for technical lore and critical discussion has advanced and widened apace.
 | 1001 Days Ago
The Art of Versification: A Practical Handbook of the Structure of Verse Together with Chapters on the Origin Nature and Forms of Poetry. y J. Berg Esenwein (Joseph Berg), (1913). This little treatise does not aim to create poets — Heaven must do that; but it does seek to furnish those who have poetic inspirations with the knowledge of how to master the forms of expression. Poetry is first a gift, then an rnart — both the gift and the art demand cultivation.
 | 1001 Days Ago
The Art of Story Writing by J. Berg Esenwein (Joseph Berg), (1919). In early times, the professional bards and story-tellers were the only historians, passing from martial camp to palace, from public squares to any gathering of people, and weaving the mythical or the genuine deeds of gods and heroes into "histories" for the entertainment of listeners. Gradually, fact was separated from Action, until now there is a great gulf fixed between history and fictive story. True, the gulf is not impassable, for while history now deals solely with fact, or what it believes to be fact, it often adopts the story form; and while most stories are fictitious, some are woven chiefly of history, and all stories are sure to contain fact in greater or lesser degree. The truth remains, however, that story and history are now distinct. The term "story" includes a wide variety of narrative terms, but broadly it may be defined as the narration of a real or a fictitious action, dealing with thoughts, or motives, or feelings.
 | 1006 Days Ago
Some Observations On The Art Of Narrative by Phyllis Eleanor Bentley (1947)
 | 1006 Days Ago
Art in Short Story Narration: A Practical Treatise by Henry Albert Phillips (1913). MANY books have been written bearing chiefly upon the technical side of fiction construction, but few indeed, if any have taken a step further and undertaken to analyze and reconstruct the artistic qualifications essential to fiction literature. Sometimes it is easier to tell how to do a thing, than it is to do it or to define intelligently the nature of the thing to be done. The literary craft has been informed so often how it should do its work, that it seems refreshing to be told in definite terms just what that work is.
 | 1006 Days Ago
The Technique of the Novel. The Elements of the Art, Their Evolution and Present Use by Charles Francis Horne (1908). The aim of this book is to make clear the principles that underlie the most popular form of literature, the novel. With this end in view these pages trace historically and by the aid of constant illustration the development of the art of novel writing. Considering the present frequently lamented "tyranny of the novel," it is surprising that the technique of this influential form of art has not been more closely studied. Its principles are often loosely discussed, and histories of the novel or critiques on the work of individuals are abundant; but nowhere has the complete body of accepted law been gathered and formulated for common use.
 | 1023 Days Ago
How to Write Short Stories (1921) - Chapter I. Common Sense in Viewing One's Work. Chapter II. The Necessary Mental Equipment. Chapter III. Finding Time and Material. Chapter IV. Hints for Equipping The Shop. Chapter V.Common Business Sense in Meeting the Market. Chapter. VI. The Great Art of Story Writing: Construction. Chapter VII. The Great Art of Story Writing : Style. Chapter VIII. The Great Art of Story Writing: Adaption of Style to Material. Chapter IX. The Great Art of Story Writing: The Element of Suspense — Viewpoint. Chapter X. The Great Art of Story Writing: Characterization. Chapter XI. The Great Art of Story Writing : Plots. Chapter XII. Using Acquaintance as Material. Chapter XIII. The Author's Personal Responsibility. Chapter XIV. The Editors. Chapter XV. Criticism. Chapter XVI. Help from Other Writers. Chapter XVII. When You're Tempted to Shut Up Shop. Chapter XVIII. The Business of Writing — A Summing Up.
 | 1026 Days Ago
The Tell-Tale Heart by Edgar Allan Poe: Edgar Allan Poe (19 January 1809 – 7 October 1849) was an American writer best known for stories of mystery and horror. Poe also wrote poetry, including the well known poem “The Raven”. Not much is known about Poe’s untimely death, but it cannot be debated that he has had a great influence on American literature.


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